5 Apr 2013

Cork City - Paint & Putty, Oh My!

So, I had myself a complete suburbian settlement on my hands, but it look a bit too much like raw MDF (what a surprise!) and who wants to live in houses made of MDF, eh? Thus I embarked on a grand adventure of Putty & Paint to bring some more patina to the houses of Cork City!

The MadMechaGuy houses are still brilliant bang for your buck, but like all MDF-cut stuff, with interconnectors, these houses suffered from too much of a "model kit" look, once assembled. Undaunted, I gave it no nevermind until I had undercoated the first building and decided, that, well, it still had that look.

This meant that I now had to experiment (yay!) with an easy method on how to hide these connectors and turn the MDF look into more of a concrete look - suited for suburban housing. My first call to port was Acryllic Paste that I bought on the cheap at a local store called Søstrene Grene (The Sisters Grene) for around £3.


Now, while it did work, to an extend, it wasn't exactly easy to apply and the drying times are horrendeous (for a member of Generation X-Y anyway). Still, as an added bonus I now have an easy-to-use plaster-like material for my houses!

So, next up I tried to block off the corner with pieces of card to hide the joins. While this worked beautifully, I would like to remind my dear readers that cutting, drawing and gluing anything resembling a straight line just doesn't work for me. At all. So, it worked out okay, but it will become too much hassle for me in the long run.



Another experiment, was to puchase something called plastictree from a local hardware shop. This increased the budget by £5, and so far I'm not entirely convinced. It's hard to get out of the tube and even harder to apply - but it looks like mud (or anything but wood really), so that's a bonus!


I then tried the Liquid Green Stuff method, courtesy of Games Workshop and hideously overpriced, as per their standard. However, as far as I can tell, then this stuff is actually the best of the methods I've tried out for now in regards to ease of appliance, drying time and overall effect. I will test out some Acryllic Gel instead in a near future to see if it'll work better.


Unless, of course, I just decide to just paint them all up nice'n'proper and ignore these seams in the future. I am, after all, more interested in quick and easy fixes rather than complete and complex modelling projects, akin to dollhouses. After all, I didn't bother with the interiors of these buildings for a reason!